Darkness surrounded Jake.

Darkness and unspeakable cold.

He had postponed the cryogenic cycle until his air was almost depleted. Now all he could do was wait. Wait and hope that Horizon, one of the two Horizons, would detect the faint energy signature. Or else he’d remain in the cryogenic chamber indefinitely.

Lying in the narrow space of the chamber he recalled his desperate flight to the chamber.

“…and prosper.” satisfied with his dying words he looked at the console. The line was dead.

Cursing he turned around, several times. The reactor was no longer posing a threat in terms of exploding, at least for now. There was still the issue of hydrogen gas in the reactor chamber. For now it was too thinly spread to pose any threat, all the water vapor circling around beta’s interior would sooner or later settle.

In his desperate turns around the reactor control room he stopped as his eyes fell on a dusty cabinet. Intrigued he pushed himself off from the console, floated over.

It was unlocked, inside were suits.

Although there was no gravity, simulated or otherwise, he could tell they were heavy. Radiation suits!

Holding the suit in his hands his glance fell on the door. Slightly the lights dimmed. Batteries were running low, radiation was interfering with the electronics holding the door in place, the reactor was not producing an ounce of energy.

Quite ungracefully he slipped into the suit, managed to seal it. That took most of an hour, but he had no other choice.

Even if it should prove futile, he had nothing better to do. Should he be curling up into a ball and contemplate his life?

No, he definitely wasn’t going to do that, even though at times, in frustration over the difficulties he had with the suit, he thought about it.

With use of a heavy mechanical wheel he closed the valves releasing the contaminated steam into the hallway outside the control room. The suit protected him, but only that much, he still would drop dead after a few minutes in that steam.

A thud went through the entire ring, a few moments after he had opened the door. They’re finally moving it out from in between the Horizon parts.

Lights flashed before his eyes. Lights that weren’t there.

Frowning he pushed on. He knew that meant that high energy particles were leaking into the suit, reacting with his eyes.

On his head the glasses went crazy. Linked with his implant they alerted him to dangerous levels of radiation.

Navigating the hallways in dimming lights and no gravity was more like navigating a maze.

At an intersection he paused for a moment. One way led to the gardens, the other to the tube. Either direction would take him to the center of the ring, to what was left of the spine, where the cryogenic chambers were.

Those functioned on their own battery power, and were built to last.

Built to shield the individual inside from any radiation.

He followed the way to the tube, found the doors open, and the cab sitting inside. The steam had been routed to the gardens, but since the dors to the cab were wide open he knew that it had also entered the cab. There was no way to power the intense and power hungry magnetic fields that moved the cab through the tubes.

Left with no alternative he turned around, took the turn to the gardens.

“Glasses, I hope you are still operational.” With a few simple commands he turned them into a detector for the contaminated steam, which undoubtedly floated around the gardens in smaller and bigger clouds.

With displeasure he noticed a metallic taste in his mouth, a radiation warning messge kept blinking in the upper right corner of his glasses.

Lights in the gardens were turned off even before the beta ring was disconnected, from the small guide lights at the entrances he still got enough light to see the gardens in their weightless state. Trees and other growth was, through their roots, connected to the ground, but since the ring was moved put of position, inertia had dislodged the waters in the garden. All the ponds and small lakes now floated in the air.

Another warning popped up.

The suit’s air supply was almost gone. Having no time to marvel at the mysterious beauty of the dark, weightless garden he aimed for the access point to the spine.

His glasses adviced him to take another route as they detected, and displayed, a cloud of contaminated water in his path.

There were several of those, displayed as green specs floating around. Once he was airborne, he had no way of avoiding them, so he was left with no choice but to guess their movements and try to avoid hitting one.

Releasing that vapor into the gardens had created drafts, that had not settled down yet.

If wasn’t for the drafts, the shifting clouds of contaminated water, and the blobs of water from ponds and lakes, Jake would’ve felt at peace, floating upwards to the spine.

Flashing and beeping the suit informed him that the internal air supply was depleted, with a hiss a valve opened letting in air from outside.

Now he was even more afraid of the drifting clouds of radioactive vapor, as it would seep in through that valve and shorten his already shortened lifetime even more.

Hoping to approach the spine before vapor hit him he closed his eyes, the glasses would vibrate and beep if a cloud would approach him, so there was nothing left for him to see. He could not avoid it even if he saw it floating towards him.

Proximity alert tore him out from his silent prayers to what ever diety, or supernatural energy was out there. He opened his eyes.

Cold, lifeless and barely lit, the surface of the spine took up all of his field of vision. He latched on to it. Carefully, as not to push himself off again, he handled towards the access point.

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