Hissing. Doom spelling hissing led Kanitha through the corridor lit only by her flashlight. Sutherland followed her closely, until they found the source of that hiss. A air conditioning unit leaking almost pure oxygen into the hallway. Glad it was not a decompression leak Kanitha sat down next to it. “As long as there is nothing to light this up, were not going to suffocate or die right now.” She leaned her head against the wall.

“There are escape pods.” Sutherland too sat down.

“Where?” With a frowning expression he pointed upwards. “Near main engineering. Battery operated, cryogenic escape pods. We wouldn’t be able to go to RV-p296, but dash 1 is close by.”

Reclining against the wall Kanitha made a dismissive gesture. “Main engineering is more of a furnace right now. Even if the plasma has leaked into space by now, the secondary fires it started will still rage, the metals will be hot for days on end. We can’t hold out that long either.”

Slamming his fist on the ground Sutherland got up. “Listen here, I don’t wanna die in this corridor. The pods are either broken, or they left. We have this one chance, and I’d rather die trying to make it there, than wait for death here.” He spun around on his heel and walked away.

For a moment Kanitha was tempted to let him walk into his own undoing, but then got up too.

Ascending through a narrow staircase, filled with dust and debris, decades upon decades of neglected use had left in it, Kanitha noticed a light a few decks above them. It was not the menacing glow of molten metal or plasma from the reactor, but the shiny glow of a flashlight. “Hello?” She couldn’t resist the urge to yell to the owner, or owners of the light source. As much as she valued Jackson Sutherland as company, she was hoping for further survivors.

“Hello!” A man returned her call. “How are things up there?” Sutherland asked while taking two steps at a time, a task that became increasingly easy. “Hot, but we’re holding up.” The voice of a woman.

So they were at least two. Kanitha figured. Upon reaching their level Kanitha saw three women and two men. They were huddled together next to an air duct.

“Behind that door, fires of hell.” One of the men commented. He was a civilian.

When things went from bad to worse much the civilian population was transported to subgamma, so they could hold out there. Kanitha feared that most had died anyway.

“We’re on the wrong deck anyway.” Sutherland noted upon seeing the door, pointing up. “Up there is just more of the same.” Francine Harris, an engineering colleague of Kanitha wrinkled her forehead. “We know. We camefrom one deck up originally.” Sutherland sighed, glancing up the stairs. No fires or glowing metals to be seen.

“Near engineering, there are supposedly emergency pods. Battery operated cryogenic pods. We could reach the linker colony and live.” Kanitha tried to sound optimistic.

For a few moments the five looked puzzled until they got up in unison. “What are we waiting for then?” Gerry Polanski smiled, stepping on the first step of the stairs.

As foretold by Francine temperature increased by each deck they ascended. Hopes to find the lifepods intact, or at all, was decreasing as the temperatures rose. “This is it.” Jackson stopped. “The door is almost hot enough to set someone or something touching it ablaze. No chance I’ll be going through there.” The civilian, Nepumo Ricosta, took a step back. “Perhaps we can patch up one of the pods on a lower level?” Maria Trinidad, an Ensign, suggested with little hope shining through her tone.

“Not here.” Jackson poimted at the door. “There!” A door, almost hidden inside the wall opposite of the exit, halfway up to the next deck, said “Lifepods” on it, in tiny, dust covered, painted letters.

Quickly the party rushed up the stairs, Sutherland opened the door, which was surprisingly not locked due to decompression behind it.

Kanitha and he surmised that the emergency life pods were in a specially sealed and shielded compartment, so the micro asteroids rushing through the spine did not harm it. In addition the molten reactor in front of the pod chamber provided a dense shield of immense heat, vaporising any micro asteroid passing through.

The room was dimly lit, but in stark contrast to the rest of the ship, it was lit. Only a few meters from the door the room ended, with a ladder leading up and down.

“I see only four pods, we’re seven people!” Nepumo shrieked.

Now Kanitha knew where she had seen him before. He had a broadcasting show on the Horizon net. “There are four more below, and four above us. I suspect there are again some another deck lower, and higher. But the ones I see, are plenty for us.” Jackson returned from the ladder.

He began drawing up the sensor data the pods could collect with the built in sensor arrays. “Alright. There’s only these twelve, and we have to fill them bottom up.” A rumble went through the ship, suddenly weightlessness set in. “Molten structure ground up against the suspension. Gravity’s gone.” Kanitha calmed the nerves of the others.

As long as the simulated gravity was there, heat was rising upwards, melting the materials it met. Now that was gone. An alarm sounded, and the access door slammed shut from inside the wall. “Apparently, this is our last stop on Horizon. Air pressure in the staircase is gone.” April Wallner, commented checking the sign at the door.

“Alright, Maria, Francine, Gerry, take Nepumo down there and get ready, enter your pods, I’ll program the coordinates for ES-p296-1 from here.”

“Wait, why can’t we wait on Dawn?” Gerry stopped the others from doing as Jackson had told them to. “Surely they received the distress signals. They will come pick us up. Or the pods launched from Dusk already.”

With a sigh Jackson shook his head. Telling them would not ease their concerns, he knew. He entered a few commands into the console in front of him. “Dawn Horizon got picked up by the linkers. I saw it in the sensor logs, they rushed here, while we hadn’t even met in that staircase, they had arrived here.” A video was on display.

Dawn Horizon appeared, a foreign shaped ship between subalpha and alpha. Within moments they collected all the pods that were sending out distress signals and after a short time the entire group of ships disappeared again.

Silence befell the room. “I don’t mean to be an ass here, but what the fuck?” Gerry pushed away from the display.

“It’s over, man. They abandoned us!” Nepumo panicked. Attempting to slap him proved difficult for Kanitha, but she managed. “They didn’t know we’re here, or still alive for that matter!”

For a moment the others stared at the display. “Forgive my saying so, but what if we hijack one of those?” April enhanced the image on the display. An inert landing pod floated in space. “There is no apparent damage, we can scan it from here for confirmation that it is still working, if not we go with the escape pods for the linker moon. If it is we can bring this thing to the moon with us.” Intrigued Sutherland raised his eyebrows. He held on to the wall of the pod next to the display. “Sensors show it is fully operational, it got torn off the superstructure, with the docking clamps and part of the superstructure, so it is fully operational, and undamaged.” Frantically typing away at the display he programmed the escape pods to dock with the landing craft, while Gerry, Maria and Francine brought Nepumo to the pods on the lower deck, and began boarding them.