Posts tagged ‘pen’

Life ain’t that hard, writing!

If you are like me, you can’t wait for an opportunity to hit the keys and type away, writing stories. Or grabbing a pen or other form of writing utensil.

All the more delighting, NaNoWriMo is coming up! Today!

But there we stumble into the most devastating issue of them all, people who make writing more complicated than it truly is.
So you get “helpful advice” and writing “tips” from people who co-wrote a book on How to Publish stuff, with an astonishing track record of having co-publisbed the book on How to Publish stuff.

Look people, writing ain’t that hard, here:

1. You make a schedule, you end up doing homework. Chores. Nothing with passion. If you have 5 minutes or more, write, ditch the schedule.

2. You make an outline, you will probably deviate so far from your outline, your outline describes another story. Keep it vague, if you do outline.

3. You find a place where you can write, and I assure you, you’ll either write about the magnificence of that place, or not at all because you are distracted by the magnificence of that place. (Stay away from Starbucks, you pretentious halfwitted sacks of wasted skin!)

4. Measuring anything is for dick measuring contests, not for writing. Creating pressure with a creative process is like demanding water to flow upwards (on its own). Unless you are a type-whore writing other people’s ideas, in which case, know that I despise you.

5. You ain’t never written anything longer than a page: do not write a novel. No discouragement intended, but start slow. Essays, Shortstories, and then you can start on the longer stuff.

6. Editorial is done AFTER writing. Don’t get yourself down with that stuff while writing, it can wait. Anyine telling you otherwise, is deliberately sabotaging you.

7. Forget it. Forget all of it. Not your story, or great story idea, but the advice. The aforementioned six points, other people’s “helpful advice”. Forget all of it.
If you have the creative genius inside you, you will write. Pen on paper, stick in clay, on computers of all sizes, in the woods, the bog, in the streets, … doesn’t matter. If you have that spark, you will write. Before, during and after NaNoWriMo, for the occassion, or completely unrelated. You don’t need any of these oh so helpful advises, none of the wisecracking dipshits who co-published a book on how to defecate properly in public.
So, forget it. Unless you don’t have the creativity, in which case I must inquire why you … well. Everyone has dreams.
Go at it.

Take care,
A

Writers and their tools

I saw a post on an entertainment page the other day *cough*9gag*cough* about famous authors and what they use for writing.

What they prefer, for writing.

Most used some sort of pen, glorifying it as if the pen was actually the author, not them. One used a typewriter, one a computer, older than dirt.

I sat there and scratched my head.

Not because they used that shit, or glorified it beyond belief (as if they got paid for it?).
But because I always saw them waaaaay beyond my reach, still do. I could never come anywhere close to their league, let alone play in it (I’d lose, I know that).
As I thought about that I also had to think about my writing preferences, and I shall let you in on them.

ANYTHING THAT I CAN USE TO BRING THOUGHTS INTO WRITTEN FORM.

Be it my tablet, cellphone, netbook, notebook, desk computer, pen and paper, nails and flesh.

Thought -> something -> written out

Perfect!
I don’t have a favorite writing utensil, no fetish for a certain tool, other than my mind, I don’t need shit. I don’t need the perfect pen, a reliable trusty old computer or typewriter from the GeStaPo! I need a tool to bring thoughts into written form, and that is it.

It is my opinion that as soon as you glorify your writing utensil, you’re on a downward slope. I obsiosly seem to be mistaken, since all these famous and successful writiers do it, but for me it doesn’t work.

To my fellow writiers out there who have issues with this as well, keep writing on what ever platform is handy to you, and don’t strive to be like the famous ones. You are unique. Your writing is unique, and so it should be with how you write.

Carry on,
A.